Museums - Connecticut


Back to Resources: Semaphore Lists


Location: Essex, CT

The Valley Railroad Company
P.O. Box 452
Essex, CT 06426

The Valley Railroad in has an operating dwarf semaphore showing
red and yellow that communicates info regarding 
grade crossing status. I presume it is from the New Haven Railroad.
Information kindly supplied by Paul Williams.


Location: East Windsor, CT

Connecticut Trolley Museum 
http://www.iconn.net/trolley/ 

The Connecticut Trolley Museum is believed to have both Federal and Hall semaphores in the collection. 
Unfortunately, no additional details are available at this time.

The Connecticut Trolley Museum, located in East Windsor, Connecticut, is owned and operated by
the Connecticut Electric Railway Association, Inc., founded in October 1940. It is the nation's
oldest incorporated organization dedicated to the preservation of streetcars and the Trolley Era. As a
non-profit institution, its educational and historical aim is the establishment of a full size operating
street and interurban railroad system with the appropriate accessory equipment and buildings, to
recreate an important phase of New England's business and social life from 1890 to 1945.


Location: Waterbury, CT

The Railroad Museum of New England & Naugatuck RR
PO Box 4658
Waterbury, CT 06704-4869
http://www.rmne.org/

A significant amount of semaphore signal equipment is currently in storage.
Plans for future restoration are restricted by display area limitations.
Manufacturers and styles are unknown at this time.

Information supplied by Al Galanty
allan.1.galanty@snet.net


Location: N. Canaan, CT

Canaan Union Station (update  Nov 27, 1998)

There is a semaphore in the plaza of the Canaan Union Station at N. Canaan, CT
(Rte 44 and 7). It formerly guarded the diamond in front of the station where
the Central New England tracks crossed over the Housatonic Ry. (both ultimately
New Haven lines). A Mr. Hanlon, the owner of the current Housatonic Ry. has
discussed returning the semaphore to its original location, but this is not
considered a top priority.

Information kindly supplied by Mark Kolodny